EasyEngine v4 Install Tutorial & Benchmark Results

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Ferdian Alfianto

Ferdian Alfianto

Ferdian Alfianto is an Internet enthusiast, Mac Lover; likes using Wordpress, experimenting with Linux (especially Debian and Ubuntu), tinkering with pfSense routers, happy experimenting with LEMP (Linux, Nginx, MariaDB, PHP) and Redis. You can contact me here.

On November 22, 2018, rtCamp as the developer of EasyEngine, has released EasyEngine version 4 which has a very different structure from previous releases. So that rtCamp released 2 versions, EasyEngine v4 and WordOps. WordOps has the same structure as EasyEngine v3.

Some of the changes in EasyEngine v4 are:

  1. The email hosting feature was completely removed.
  2. The number of WordPress sites is limited to 25 sites per machine, for WordPress Multi Users it still counts as 1 site.
  3. For WordPress cache, it doesn't use W3Total Cache or any other plugins, but only uses one cache, namely Redis Cache.
  4. There are some commands that are deleted, some are updated and replaced, there are also new commands added.
  5. PHP code is rewritten by rtCamp, using WP-CLI as framework.
  6. Using Docker for PHP, Nginx, MySQL, etc .; different from the previous version which used the traditional method at the OS level.
  7. Using two Nginxs; one as a web server, and the other as a reverse proxy.
  8. Redis does not only Object Caching, but also full page caching.
  9. The WordPress.com VIP Go feature is available

EasyEngine v4 Filesystem Structure

By default, all sites will be put in / opt / easyengine / sites /.

So for example domain.com, the location of the root file will be placed in /opt/easyengine/sites/domain.com.

The following is the filesystem structure on the PHP / Wordpress site on EasyEngine v4:

.
| - app
| - htdocs
| __ wp-config.php
| - config
| - nginx
| - php
| __ postfix
| - docker-compose-admin.yml
| - docker-compose.yml
| - logs
| - nginx
| __ php
| __ services
| - postfix
| - mariadb
| - conf
| - data
| __ logs

Requirements

Still the same as v3, EasyEngine v4 can only run on Ubuntu versions 12.04, 14.04, 16.04, 18.04 and Debian 7 & 8. For this tutorial I'm using Ubuntu 18.04.

Also you need a VPS with at least 1 GB RAM.

Installation

First, make sure that the Ubuntu VPS is up to date by running the following command:

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade -y

Install EasyEngine v4 with the command:

wget -qO ee rt.cx/ee4 && sudo bash ee

To create a WordPress site, simply run the command:

sudo ee site create yourdomain.com --type = wp --ssl = le --cache

The command above is to tell EasyEngine to create a WordPress site (–Type = wp) with a domain yourdomain.com, as well as installing an SSL certificate from Lets Encrypt (--Ssl = le), and use Redis for caching (–Cache).

NOTE: Make sure your domain has been directed to your VPS IP address before executing the command above.

If successful, your WordPress site information will appear, along with your username, password, database info, and more (see image below).

EasyEngine v4 installation has been completed, now you can login to the WordPress site.

Benchmarks

For benchmarks, I'll be using the services of LoadImpact, with the first test configuration of 50 users with a duration of 10 minutes, and the second test with 100 users and a duration of 15 minutes.

As for WordPress, I will use a theme from WP Astra, with the Product Landing Page demo. For plugins there are Elementor Builder, Nginx Helper and WP Redis.

As for the VPS spec, I use the services of Hetzner, with VPS specs of 1 CPU, 2 GB RAM and 20 GB SSD.

Because my server location is in Nuremberg, Germany; so for the LoadImpact test, I used the European region, namely Germany and the UK.

Benchmark Results 1

In the first test with 50 users and a duration of 10 minutes; response time averaged 57.05 ms, and 98396 requests were successfully created with an average of 164 requests per second.

Also I noted the highest CPU load was 1.53.

Benchmark Results 2

In the second test with 100 users and a duration of 15 minutes; response time averaged 108.81 ms, and 280875 requests were successfully created with an average of 313 requests per second. And the highest recorded CPU load is 1.94.

This is the tutorial for EasyEngine version 4 and the results of the benchmark test, hopefully this is useful.

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